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Konpeito

These sugary snacks were handed down from Portugal at the same time as castella. The etymology comes from the Portuguese word “confeito.” The surface has a rough surface made of protuberances, though the reason for the shape is a mystery.

Kankanbou

This is a traditional treat that has been made since ancient times in Hida. The ones found at food carts are made to look like cypress logs.
Traditionally, it’s manufactured out of kinako flour candy to look like a wooden stick.
It’s made only from kinako flour, brown sugar, and starch syrup, then hardened to and cut up like the photograph. Furthermore, it’s manually twisted to look like wood.

Karintou

This treat is made by kneading sugar, water, and other ingredients in wheat flour, then fried in a cylinder shape before being covered in sugar and honey. They’re still popular today, and lately there has been manjuu made with karintou batter.

Kurobo

This is a convenient confectionery from Kyushu. It’s theorized that it was developed from biscotti brought over by southwestern Europeans.

Sendai Dagashi

Though these have been made since the Edo and Meiji periods, they became famous after Showa 30 (1955). They’re called sasaraame, usagitama, nejiri, and okoshi, but there are many different kinds.

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