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Waste sorting is different depending on the area you live. Here are a few things you’d better know if you come live in Japan.

When you first move into you Japanese apartment, you will be given some instructions like this (picture above) on how to sort your garbage in your city and when to take them out.

Burnable

Moeru gomi/ Kanen gomi

Gomi means “garbage/waste” in Japanese. Moeru or Kanen gomi means combustible waste.

Above, the combustible garbage. It is divided in several categories :
– the kitchen garbage/ paper/clothes
– the plastic garbage
– the elastic or leather garbage
In some places, you can put everything in the same garbage. In some cities, you have to separate the plastic garbage and the paper.

Non-burnable

The non-burnable waste is called “Moenai Gomi” or “Funen Gomi” in Japanese.

Here are a few examples of non-burnable waste such as :
-Ceramic, glass
-aluminium foils
-bottle caps etc.

Hazardous waste

For the hazardous waste, rules are pretty strict. Wrap the knives in some newspaper and write in Japanese “kiken” (dangerous) on it. Lighter must be empty and you have to make a hole in spray bottles.

What material is this?! HELP!!!

Have you ever found trouble in identifying what material was the package of the noodles you’ve just eaten?

Then here are a few tips for you to help you recognize those different marks.

You can see the “Pura” (for plastic) mark on the cup noodles package.
But this is actually an old picture. Now, the cup noodles from this brand are made of paper to protect the environment.

On this juice package you have the paper mark (for the package) but also the plastic mark for the straw (written in Japanese).

The PET bottle mark

Here is the mark used for the PET bottles.

On this bottle, there are two marks. The PET bottle mark for the bottle and the “Pura”(plastic) mark for the cap and the label.

The aluminum mark

Here are the marks you will see the most. I hope it can help you recycle when you will visit Japan.

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