How to Handle Trouble in Japan: Emergency Edition

Here are some phrases that you should learn in case of emergencies that may arise during your stay in Japan. When emergencies happen suddenly, you won't remember any long phrases that you may have practiced, so all these phrases have been shortened to only what is most necessary. Please learn them just in case!

Nationwide

Travel Tips

Here is an explanation of the phrases in the video along with the situations that they can be used in. 

"Kaji da!" "Fire!"

If there's a fire, please use this phrase to tell everyone around you in a loud voice about it and find safety. In the case of a fire, the emergency number is 119. 

"Abunai!" "Watch out!"

You can use this word in many different kinds of situations to warn someone of danger, such as if there is a car rapidly approaching or if there are rocks falling when you're climbing a mountain.

"Kyukyusha wo yonde!" "Call an ambulance!"

Use this if you get seriously injured or sick. As in the case of a fire, please use 119 to call the authorities, but if you don't have a working phone or just need someone to come help, please use this phrase in a loud voice so people around you can know you need help.

"Keisatsu wo yonde!" "Call the police!" 

If you get involved in some trouble and need the police, please use this phrase. The emergency number to call the police is 110. It's not the same as the fire department or an ambulance, so please be careful!

"Tasukete!" "Help!"

If you find yourself in some trouble or have hurt yourself, please use this phrase to call for someone nearby.

"Nigete!" "Run away!"

If you witness some trouble or a worrisome situation, please use this phrase to let those around you know to flee the area.

Japan is a safe country, but you may still run into trouble during your trip. If you check out the video and this article in advance, you'll know what to do if the worst happens!

 

Header Image: MAHATHIR MOHD YASIN / Shutterstock

If you want to give feedback on any of our articles, you have an idea that you'd really like to see come to life, or you just have a question on Japan, hit us up on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram!

The information in this article is accurate at the time of publication.

Things to Do

Hotels & Ryokan

Shopping

Restaurant Search