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What kind of place is an izakaya?

Japanese izakaya are an important part of social life since you can drink cheaply.
They also have different styles of food like Japanese, Chinese, Italian, and more so you keep coming back for more.

“Izakaya” entered the English language by 1987.[1]?It is a compound word consisting of “i” (to stay) and “sakaya” (sake?shop), indicating that izakaya originated from sake shops that allowed customers to sit on the premises to drink.

Izakaya dining can be intimidating to non-Japanese with the wide variety of menu items and the slow pace of the meal. Food is normally ordered slowly over several courses rather than all at once. The kitchen will serve the food when it’s ready rather than in formal courses like Western restaurants. Typically a beer is ordered when sitting down before perusing the menu. Delicately flavored dishes such assushi?or?edamame?are ordered first, followed with progressively more robust flavors such as?yakitori?or kara-age, finishing the meal with a rice or noodle dish to fill up.

Everything looks delicious! Izakaya dishes

Standard: Yakitori;?photo by y kawahara

A standard menu item is yakitori.
There are multiple flavors, usually salt or a bittersweet sauce.

You’ll want hiyayakko

This chilled dish is scallions, grated ginger, bonito, and other condiments on tofu! Healthy!

You’ll want to eat it if they have it: grilled greenling;?photo by Jun OHWADA

Dried, grilled greenling goes perfect with both beer and Japanese sake. Eat it with lemon, grated daikon, and soy sauce.

If you’re drinking beer, you need edamame

The representative snack to eat with beer is young soybeans (edamame) boiled with salt. Sweet and salty deliciousness in a bite.

You’ll be addicted to the spiciness: Chijimi;photo by Koji Horaguchi

Chijimi is originally Korean, but has become a staple food in izakaya.
It’s a thin egg and flour batter fried with lots of vegetables, meat, or seafood.
The different sauces used for dipping enhance the flavors and make it delicious.

A blending of Western and Japanese food: Shuuto Cheese;photo by sumiisan

Shuuto is made from pickling fish in salt, and this is made by putting shuuto over cream cheese. Though you might need courage to try this, its sourness and acidity matches perfectly with Japanese liquor.

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