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The summer grass is all that’s left of ancient warriors’ dreams

This is a haiku composed by poet Basho while on a narrow path.

Portrait of Basho

◆◆National Treasure: Inuyama Castle◆◆

This might be the only castle that has stayed the same as it was during the Warring States period.

It was highly important as a location in the military affairs and the demon king Oda Nobunaga and the capture of Mino, and it also became the setting of many battles during the Warring States period.

◆◆National Treasure: Matsumoto Castle◆◆

That Takeda Shingen told Uesugi Kenshin that guaring this castle was of paramount importance.
They had overthrown the Okazawara family, and since then it was passed over to Shingen for a long time and was maintained as a fortress.

After Takeda’s downfall, the devil king Nobunaga was the most important, and Kiso Yoshimasa became the lord of the castle.
After the Honnouji Incident, they raided Echigo’s Tiger (Uesugi Kenshin) and just like that Kiso Yoshimasa took over the castle.

After that there were many ups and downs and it became the territory of Tokugawa until the present day.

◆◆National Treasure and World Heritage Himeji Castle◆◆

This is a famous, historical castle that was presented to the Oda clan’s Toyotomi Hideyoshi free of charge by the rare tactician, Kuroda Kanbei.

During the Edo period, as the west’s most important location, Tokugawa Ieyasu appointed Ikeda Terumasa and he turned it into the enormous fortress that it is today.

It is also famous as a UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage site.

◆◆Bonus: Takeda Shiroato◆◆

Famous as “Japan’s Macchu Picchu” and called “the Castle in the Sky, this is the Takeda Shiroato (castle ruins).
From this terrain, you can see the dense fog called “unkai” (sea of clouds) from above.
It’s known as an extremely beautiful scenic area.

It’s currently one of Japan’s most popular sight-seeing spots.

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