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1. Anmitsu

Anmitsu is made with anko (a jam made from boiling sweet adzuki beans), zero-calorie agar-agar jelly, and fruits that are then covered in brown sugar syrup. This is a standard offering at Japanese tea shops. It’s an enjoyable dish to eat with tea.

www.flickr.com; photo by Hitoshi Taguchi

This is an extravagant version that includes small white balls of mochi.

2.Taiyaki

This sea bream shaped pastry is filled, usually with anko, but you can sometimes find other fillings like chocolate or custard. It’s best when just freshly made.

3. Mitarashi Dango

Mitarashi dango are balls of mochi covered in a sticky sauce made of soy sauce and sugar.
The visual and the smell both stimulate the appetite.

photozou.jpphoto by オハニワ ハニャ男 (Ohaniwa Ohanyaotoko)

4. Rakugan

These candies melt in your mouth and spread the sweetness. It’s an elegant Japanese candy.

It’s a dried candy made by mixing starchy rice flour with starch syrup, sugar, and coloring, then placed into molds. After that, it’s filled with anko, adzuki beans, chestnuts, or other filling, then pressed together to create one candy.

ja.wikipedia.org

5. Konpeito

These colorful, cute Japanese candies can take 1 to 2 weeks before they’re done.

6. Ningyoyaki

These pastries are made of dough modeled in the shape of faces and then stuffed full of anko jam.
Sometimes people are hesitant to eat them because of the expressions on the faces.

7.Mizu Youkan

This is the ultimate zero calorie sweet. It’s a Japanese jelly made with zero calorie agar-agar, a small amount of anko, and sugar. It’s recommended that you eat this chilled during the summer.

www.fotopedia.comphoto by [puamelia]

8. Namagashi

The delicate work put into nagamashi to make them look like flowers or other natural motif makes it feel like it’s almost a waste to eat them. Because wagashi makers change their products to go with the seasons, you can enjoy the seasons through sweets.

9. Oshiruko

If there’s something Japanese people definitely want to eat in the winter, it’s oshiruko.
In the warm soup made with anko, there’s grilled mochi and shiratama dumplings.

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