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1. Meiji Jingu Gaien 

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Meiji Jingu Gaien is a famous spot where you can see a gorgeous autumn sight while still being in Tokyo. About 300m of the street is lined with 146 gingko trees, so you can enjoy a very lovely sight. While walking is good too, if you drive you can feel like you’re in a movie.

HP: www.meijijingugaien.jp

HP: www.meijijingugaien.jp (Japanese Only)

Address: Kasumigaoka-machi 1-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo(Google Map)

2. Otaguro Park

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Otaguro Park is a Japanese garden with a pond at teh center, and you can see the sight of many gingko trees lined up. It’s free to enter, and the grounds are quite large so you can enjoy gorgeous autumnal foliage. It’s lit up at night, so you can find yourself in a very magical environment.

HP: www.hakone-ueki.com (Japanese Only)

Address: Ogikubo 3-33-12, Suginami-ku, Tokyo (Google Map)

3. Tonogayato Park 

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Tonogayato Park has about 190 Japanese maple trees so you can enjoy a beautiful autumn sight. The foliage is best from mid-November to early December, and it’s only 2 minutes away from the train station. There are many rest areas, and it’s a place full of nature that will make you forget you’re in Tokyo.

Address: 2-16 Minamicho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo (Google Map)

4. Okutama

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Okutama is a popular area in the autumn, since you can enjoy impressive autumn foliage. You can stroll around on the walking paths, or drive through. The sight of the trees reflected in the surface of the lake is magical.

 

5. Inokashira Park

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Inokashira Park, a spot that’s often filled with people, is also a famous area for autumn scenery. The foliage is great, and the sight of the park at sundown is mystical. You can take a duck boat around the lake and leisurely enjoy yourself. It’s very popular as a date spot.

HP: www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp (Japanese Only)

Address: Gotenyama 1-18-31, Musashino-shi, Tokyo (Google Map)

6. Mt. Takao

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This is another very popular spot for foliage, so much so that people come from far away yearly to see it. It’s about an hour from the center of the city, so its easy access is one of its major characteristics. You can take a cable car to the summit, and the view is exquisite. Many people go to Mt. Takao just to see the foliage. The best time to go is mid-late November.

HP: takaozanyuho.com (Japanese Only)

7. Rikugien

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Rikugen is an extremely popular autumn spot. At night, it’s lit up, and the beautiful foliage is reflected in the surface of the lake. The magical, mystifying environment gives this place an atmosphere different from other areas with nice foliage. There are many people that only go to Rikugien to get their fill of fall. The best time to go is mid-November to early December.

HP: teien.tokyo-park.or.jp (Japanese Only)

Address: 6 Hon-Komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo(Google Map)

8. Showa Memorial Park

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Showa Memorial Park is so huge it’s the equivalent of 39 Tokyo Domes, and it’s a popular spot to enjoy the foliage. You can walk around the Japanese garden, but it’s also fun to cycle around. It’s close to the station, and it’s visited by many people every fall. The best time to go is early November to early December.

 

HP: www.showakinen-koen.jp

HP: www.showakinen-koen.jp (中文)

HP: www.showakinen-koen.jp (Japanese)

Address:  3173 Midoricho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo  (Google Map)

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